The Right Server Choice

How to find the server that fits right in with your organization
Servers being so vital, it is natural that you would want one that meets your requirements and remains cost-effective. If you’re having trouble deciding, continue reading.
Servers are the powerhouses behind day to day operations in an organization. They house immense processing power, high memory and storage that processes requests and hosts services.  They also keep your organization’s sensitive information safe and secure.
Tower Servers
If you are a rather small company or an independent F&B establishment, you wouldn’t require much computing power. Then the simple and bulky Towers can address your needs. They come at a cheap price and upgrading them is easy and cost effective.

 

 

Towers can thrive in your small business but have no place in the big leagues. It comes at the price of tricky cable management, consumption of space and offers only basic performance. Due to their bulky size and shape stacking them one on top of the other or moving them around becomes a challenge.
While Tower Servers cost the least, they simply cannot substantiate to the needs of a bigger operation. When an organization requires more than four servers, it is more feasible to opt for Rack Servers which will occupy lesser space and give more computing power.
Rack Servers
Compared to Tower servers, Rack Servers offer higher computing power while occupying lesser space. In a Rack Server, the servers are stacked in bays which puts out a lot of heat and requires a dedicated cooling system. This helps avoid machine failure and damage to systems; this results in high power consumption.

 

 

Rack Servers come with their own cable management making cabling easier and more organized. An added benefit of Rack Severs is the ability to identify and isolate faulty servers and replace them without disrupting the entire array. As they become bigger, they cease to be economical as the power consumption and maintenance becomes very expensive.
Blade Servers
For Enterprises that are looking to scale up over the next two to three years, a blade server will be the better choice for it allows you to add new servers or upgrade existing ones with great ease without even having to power down your servers.
With the most of the cabling done internally, they can be packaged tighter together - making them highly space efficient. Blade Server’s high component density makes managing the HVAC a challenge. They have a single interface which makes managing the servers a breeze. While the initial configuration costs seem high, the ease of scalability makes it worth it.
Blade servers while being the most expensive out of the three, becomes more cost effective the higher it is scaled. They consume less power compared to Rack Servers which helps lower IT costs and increases server power.

 

 

To Conclude
There is no one true solution when it comes to your servers in the Data Center it rather depends on your requirements. If you are a small company and don’t need more than four servers a Tower Server will suit your needs just fine. If you are a medium business and need more computing power the Rack server might be better suited for you, however if it is raw computing power you are after to handle large number of servers a Blade Server can do that for you.
As your company grows its computing requirements grow with it. As a result, your IT costs may seem through the roof, but compromise is not an option if you want to remain competitive in today’s market.

Disclaimer

This Blog Post is for informational purposes only. Any information provided on the KIT Blog is accurate and true to the best of our knowledge, but that there may be omissions, errors or mistakes. Even though KIT is an IT Consultancy, the KIT Blog must not be seen or substituted as any kind of Consultative advice. Readers must not rely solely on any information posted on the KIT Blog, doing so would be at their own risk. For any Consultative advice regarding IT solutions, products and/or services, please contact info@kit.ae.

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